Get e-book To the Sun and Back

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online To the Sun and Back file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with To the Sun and Back book. Happy reading To the Sun and Back Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF To the Sun and Back at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF To the Sun and Back Pocket Guide.

My mother was a teacher. My father ran a restaurant where the atmosphere was like a town meeting every day. Barsamian: I have a somewhat similar background. My parents fled the Turkish genocide of the Armenians. They met in Beirut in an arranged marriage and came to New York. My father opened a grocery store and worked long hours. We lived upstairs in a tenement, and the grocery store was downstairs. Nader: Trump wants to admit only skilled immigrants, like doctors, engineers, and computer scientists.

Where would tens of millions of Americans have been? Barsamian: Trump is a pretty easy target. Barsamian: So far. Ninety percent of Republicans still support him. Nader: Ninety percent of Republicans is less than 25 percent of voters. So many people who voted for Trump hated Clinton. Remember, Trump was not elected by a majority of the vote. He was selected by the Electoral College. We have to get rid of this crazy, antiquated system where you can come in second running for president, as George W.

Bush did to Al Gore in by half a million votes, and you still become president. So they like that. Deregulation — they like that, too, even though most regulations are so out of date they have hardly any bite to them. They love the huge expansion of the military budget. So they like him so far. Barsamian: One focus for the Republicans in was the Supreme Court. To the religious Right, in particular, it was a critical issue. Nader: Of course, because once you get a nominee confirmed by the Senate, he or she is on the court for life.

What we have now is such a razor-edge system. If John Kerry had gotten about a hundred thousand more votes in Ohio in , he would have won the election and made two nominations to the Supreme Court. The Democratic Party cannot defend our nation against the most corrupt, ignorant, Wall Street—indentured, warmongering, corporatist, pro-corporate-welfare, antiworker, anticonsumer, anti-environmentalist Republican Party since it was created in So when you go after Trump and the Republicans, ask yourself who put them in office.

Barsamian: Would you favor term limits for Supreme Court justices? Nader: Yes, I favor twelve years and out. In fact, the appointment system has resulted in such corporatist judges that the court has repeatedly voted to entrench the corporate state. Barsamian: Gerrymandering [ the practice of redrawing legislative districts to favor one political party — Ed. Nader: Gerrymandering is basically a system in which the politicians pick the voters instead of the people picking the politicians. Democrats hate gerrymandering when Republicans control more state legislatures, and Republicans hate gerrymandering when the shoe is on the other foot.

So who is responsible? I blame both parties. Having said that, the Republicans control the majority of state legislatures and governorships, so they can gerrymander more. To combat this, the Democrats have to get a lot more people out to vote. And Democratic issues poll much better than Republican issues. The Democrats are for a higher minimum wage, and the Republicans are against a minimum wage on principle, never mind how much it is. But there is another way to break a democracy. At the hands not of generals but of elected leaders.

If those Americans think politics is dirty, why are they so surprised when they get dirty politics? Why do 90 percent of eligible voters turn out in Australia? Because in Australia voting is a civic duty. Instead we get voter suppression.

DNA Packaging: Nucleosomes and Chromatin

There is no other Western country that works so hard to block people from voting and to block serious third-party and independent candidates from getting on the ballot. And the two are connected. State ballot-access laws are horrifically difficult to surmount: short deadlines, huge numbers of names on petitions, petitions arbitrarily invalidated. People grow up thinking they have only two choices, Republican or Democrat — and they teach this, by the way, in elementary school.

We need a universal voting requirement and easy access to the ballot. It is harder to get on the ballot in North Carolina than in eight European countries. Barsamian: I thought you were going to say North Korea. There is a whiff of fascism in the air. But Franklin D.

That, in its essence, is fascism. Nader: Yes, of course. Fascism attacks any potential challenge from society. The fascist corporate state can brook no budding challenge. Barsamian: Individual journalists have been called out by the president, putting them in danger. Nader: If the Mueller investigation subpoenas Trump and he creates a constitutional crisis, I predict he will incite the people at his rallies to physically attack and injure reporters, and Trump will be sued for incitement to violence.

Though presidents are above the law when it comes to military and foreign policy, they cannot escape criminal law. The same was true for Bill Clinton, who lied under oath and was stripped of his right to practice law in Arkansas and was impeached by the House but acquitted in the Senate. Barsamian: Where do you see the Mueller investigation going? Do you think there will be indictments coming down?

Once he gets a number of convictions at the lower level, then he could go after Trump for obstruction of justice — which was, by the way, what brought Nixon down: obstructing justice in the investigation of the Watergate break-in. They are judge, jury, executioner, and cover-upper. And all recent presidents, Democrat and Republican, have expanded that authority all over the world and gotten away with it. Barsamian: Is the focus on Russian meddling in our elections a distraction or something concrete? Meddling in elections is part of our foreign policy.

Look what we did in Honduras and Ukraine under Obama. I think they wanted Trump because Hillary Clinton was very aggressive against Russia. Within months that bill was signed, actually in the presence of Harry Truman, because he had tried and failed to pass a national health-insurance plan in the late s, when he was president. What can we learn about that successful struggle?

Because the majority of people want it. Too many people have internalized this sense of powerlessness that also makes them comfortable. They make excuses for themselves so they can spend more time watching TV. But I was part of the disability-rights movement years ago, and we had seriously disabled people who got on the phone and pressured their legislators. And if they can do it, almost everyone should be able to do it. Right now when the members of Congress, all of them, look around, all they see are drug-company lobbyists and hospital-chain lobbyists with their checkbooks out.

Barsamian: Maybe we can take inspiration from what happened in the tiny, landlocked Republic of Armenia in April and May of , when tens of thousands of people took to the streets, closed down government ministries, and nonviolently overthrew an entrenched, corrupt oligarchy that had been in power for decades. It was barely reported here in the U. Nader: You make a good point.

Also In This Issue

We hear plenty about war on the news but little about peace. How about the incredible breakthrough between the neighboring countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea? Where is that reported? Colman McCarthy, who works successfully to get peace studies taught in high schools and colleges, says there are a lot of examples over the last hundred years where waging peace has worked, but 99 percent of the news coverage is of war.

Barsamian: Journalist Edward R. Nader: With apologies to the wolves. They very rarely attack humans.

Lyn - Back In Time MV (The Moon That Embraces The Sun OST) [ENGSUB + Rom + Hangul]

Nader: Knowledge of history is critical for life in the present. Civics has been downgraded in school. The older generation has to take hold here instead of letting go. History is taught at home, not just at school. When I came home from school for lunch, my mother narrated historic sagas. Sit down, son. Columbus invaded America for gold and killed the people who were here.

Astronomy Without a Telescope

Barsamian: I was also thinking of how the robber barons of the late nineteenth century led to the Progressive Era in the early twentieth. Nader: There are a lot of examples. I learned how he talked, how he motivated people, how he let you know that he was never going to sell out. And I read the great muckrakers when I was twelve or thirteen years old. I was excited beyond belief, because justice excited me. And I had lost a lot of friends in traffic accidents. Right now young people have one-sixth the probability of being killed in a traffic accident than when I was in high school.

As they say, the blasphemy of the past can become the commonplace of the future. Nader: Webster was a senator from Massachusetts and also a lawyer for the National Bank. Erich Fromm, the psychologist from Yale, defined freedom as having two parts: freedom from oppression, arbitrary authority, dictatorship, and harassment; and freedom to be civically involved in the shaping of local, state, national, and international policy — to be a citizen, to have a voice.

The rascals in charge of our plutocracy like to talk about freedom from big-government bureaucracy — but they love big government when it gives them bailouts, subsidies, legal monopolies, and so on. Our law schools are a big contributor to the decline of democracy. When I took a landlord-tenant class at Harvard Law School, we hardly got to the tenant. The money is in representing landlords. Labor law was far down in the pecking order.

Criminal law was all about street crime and domestic crime, never corporate crime. Barsamian: What do you think of recent arguments about free speech on campuses and students refusing to allow certain public figures to speak at events? Nader: The campuses have really changed. Now they have conflicts over politically correct speech. People used to be invited to speak before large auditoriums full of rapt students ready to sign petitions. Those days are over.

I really mean over. They walk through campus looking at their cellphones. They know less and less about history. They are factually deprived, in part because they think they can access any fact at their fingertips anytime, anywhere. So why would they want to know the names of the Supreme Court justices, or the name of their governor, or the name of their member of Congress? The main way to get a rise out of students today is with verbal slurs about gender and race.

All this provided camouflage to cover how his deregulators have devastated law enforcement for deadly, widespread corporate abuses. Nader: When I was in college, the right wing were the censors, and the liberals were the defenders of free speech. Barsamian: What do you think about some of these activist movements that have developed in the last few years — Black Lives Matter, Nader: Not enough elderly people in them. Retirement communities could be incubators for peaceful revolution. Their residents have a lot of leisure time. Remember the Gray Panthers?

They were started by Maggie Kuhn, a social worker for the Presbyterian Church. After she was mandatorily retired in her sixties, she was outraged. She stood up and mobilized older people all over the country. I think we ought to rouse the elderly. They have wisdom, experience, historical knowledge. These are people who have time, they have perspective, and I think they are concerned about what effect they will have on their descendants.

Barsamian: Along that line, what we are doing now to the earth is going to have an enormous impact on future generations in terms of climate change and economic and social devastation. Nader: Yes, and that can motivate young people, too, especially on campuses. Why do we so often use the words of our adversaries? It means giving taxpayer dollars to nuclear submarines or the next ten military adventures overseas instead of renovating our schools and building clinics and improving our public transit and highways and bridges and courthouses.

The language we use is very important. Nader: Yes. Liberals are very bad at coining phrases. The big corporate crime is Wells Fargo embezzling from the American people, creating fictitious accounts without even letting its customers know about it. No corporate prosecution yet, by the way, of Wells Fargo. Nader: Climate violence is spreading viruses, bacteria, infections.

His father had passed away after immigrating to Brazil. It was about economic opportunity for my father. My mother was a teacher. My father ran a restaurant where the atmosphere was like a town meeting every day. Barsamian: I have a somewhat similar background. My parents fled the Turkish genocide of the Armenians. They met in Beirut in an arranged marriage and came to New York. My father opened a grocery store and worked long hours.

We lived upstairs in a tenement, and the grocery store was downstairs. Nader: Trump wants to admit only skilled immigrants, like doctors, engineers, and computer scientists. Where would tens of millions of Americans have been? Barsamian: Trump is a pretty easy target. Barsamian: So far. Ninety percent of Republicans still support him. Nader: Ninety percent of Republicans is less than 25 percent of voters. So many people who voted for Trump hated Clinton. Remember, Trump was not elected by a majority of the vote.

He was selected by the Electoral College. We have to get rid of this crazy, antiquated system where you can come in second running for president, as George W. Bush did to Al Gore in by half a million votes, and you still become president. So they like that. Deregulation — they like that, too, even though most regulations are so out of date they have hardly any bite to them.

They love the huge expansion of the military budget. So they like him so far. Barsamian: One focus for the Republicans in was the Supreme Court. To the religious Right, in particular, it was a critical issue. Nader: Of course, because once you get a nominee confirmed by the Senate, he or she is on the court for life. What we have now is such a razor-edge system. If John Kerry had gotten about a hundred thousand more votes in Ohio in , he would have won the election and made two nominations to the Supreme Court.

The Democratic Party cannot defend our nation against the most corrupt, ignorant, Wall Street—indentured, warmongering, corporatist, pro-corporate-welfare, antiworker, anticonsumer, anti-environmentalist Republican Party since it was created in So when you go after Trump and the Republicans, ask yourself who put them in office. Barsamian: Would you favor term limits for Supreme Court justices? Nader: Yes, I favor twelve years and out. In fact, the appointment system has resulted in such corporatist judges that the court has repeatedly voted to entrench the corporate state.

Barsamian: Gerrymandering [ the practice of redrawing legislative districts to favor one political party — Ed. Nader: Gerrymandering is basically a system in which the politicians pick the voters instead of the people picking the politicians. Democrats hate gerrymandering when Republicans control more state legislatures, and Republicans hate gerrymandering when the shoe is on the other foot. So who is responsible? I blame both parties. Having said that, the Republicans control the majority of state legislatures and governorships, so they can gerrymander more.

To combat this, the Democrats have to get a lot more people out to vote. And Democratic issues poll much better than Republican issues. The Democrats are for a higher minimum wage, and the Republicans are against a minimum wage on principle, never mind how much it is. But there is another way to break a democracy. At the hands not of generals but of elected leaders.

If those Americans think politics is dirty, why are they so surprised when they get dirty politics? Why do 90 percent of eligible voters turn out in Australia? Because in Australia voting is a civic duty. Instead we get voter suppression. There is no other Western country that works so hard to block people from voting and to block serious third-party and independent candidates from getting on the ballot.

And the two are connected. State ballot-access laws are horrifically difficult to surmount: short deadlines, huge numbers of names on petitions, petitions arbitrarily invalidated. People grow up thinking they have only two choices, Republican or Democrat — and they teach this, by the way, in elementary school. We need a universal voting requirement and easy access to the ballot. It is harder to get on the ballot in North Carolina than in eight European countries.

Barsamian: I thought you were going to say North Korea. There is a whiff of fascism in the air. But Franklin D. That, in its essence, is fascism. Nader: Yes, of course. Fascism attacks any potential challenge from society. The fascist corporate state can brook no budding challenge. Barsamian: Individual journalists have been called out by the president, putting them in danger. Nader: If the Mueller investigation subpoenas Trump and he creates a constitutional crisis, I predict he will incite the people at his rallies to physically attack and injure reporters, and Trump will be sued for incitement to violence.

Though presidents are above the law when it comes to military and foreign policy, they cannot escape criminal law. The same was true for Bill Clinton, who lied under oath and was stripped of his right to practice law in Arkansas and was impeached by the House but acquitted in the Senate. Barsamian: Where do you see the Mueller investigation going? Do you think there will be indictments coming down? Once he gets a number of convictions at the lower level, then he could go after Trump for obstruction of justice — which was, by the way, what brought Nixon down: obstructing justice in the investigation of the Watergate break-in.

They are judge, jury, executioner, and cover-upper. And all recent presidents, Democrat and Republican, have expanded that authority all over the world and gotten away with it. Barsamian: Is the focus on Russian meddling in our elections a distraction or something concrete? Meddling in elections is part of our foreign policy.

References and Recommended Reading

Look what we did in Honduras and Ukraine under Obama. I think they wanted Trump because Hillary Clinton was very aggressive against Russia. Within months that bill was signed, actually in the presence of Harry Truman, because he had tried and failed to pass a national health-insurance plan in the late s, when he was president. What can we learn about that successful struggle? Because the majority of people want it. Too many people have internalized this sense of powerlessness that also makes them comfortable.

They make excuses for themselves so they can spend more time watching TV. But I was part of the disability-rights movement years ago, and we had seriously disabled people who got on the phone and pressured their legislators. And if they can do it, almost everyone should be able to do it.

Right now when the members of Congress, all of them, look around, all they see are drug-company lobbyists and hospital-chain lobbyists with their checkbooks out. Barsamian: Maybe we can take inspiration from what happened in the tiny, landlocked Republic of Armenia in April and May of , when tens of thousands of people took to the streets, closed down government ministries, and nonviolently overthrew an entrenched, corrupt oligarchy that had been in power for decades.

It was barely reported here in the U. Nader: You make a good point. We hear plenty about war on the news but little about peace. How about the incredible breakthrough between the neighboring countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea? Where is that reported? Colman McCarthy, who works successfully to get peace studies taught in high schools and colleges, says there are a lot of examples over the last hundred years where waging peace has worked, but 99 percent of the news coverage is of war.

Barsamian: Journalist Edward R. Nader: With apologies to the wolves. They very rarely attack humans. Nader: Knowledge of history is critical for life in the present. Civics has been downgraded in school. The older generation has to take hold here instead of letting go. History is taught at home, not just at school. When I came home from school for lunch, my mother narrated historic sagas. Sit down, son. Columbus invaded America for gold and killed the people who were here. Barsamian: I was also thinking of how the robber barons of the late nineteenth century led to the Progressive Era in the early twentieth.

Nader: There are a lot of examples. I learned how he talked, how he motivated people, how he let you know that he was never going to sell out. And I read the great muckrakers when I was twelve or thirteen years old. I was excited beyond belief, because justice excited me. And I had lost a lot of friends in traffic accidents. Right now young people have one-sixth the probability of being killed in a traffic accident than when I was in high school. As they say, the blasphemy of the past can become the commonplace of the future. Nader: Webster was a senator from Massachusetts and also a lawyer for the National Bank.

Erich Fromm, the psychologist from Yale, defined freedom as having two parts: freedom from oppression, arbitrary authority, dictatorship, and harassment; and freedom to be civically involved in the shaping of local, state, national, and international policy — to be a citizen, to have a voice. The rascals in charge of our plutocracy like to talk about freedom from big-government bureaucracy — but they love big government when it gives them bailouts, subsidies, legal monopolies, and so on.

Our law schools are a big contributor to the decline of democracy. When I took a landlord-tenant class at Harvard Law School, we hardly got to the tenant. The money is in representing landlords. Labor law was far down in the pecking order. Criminal law was all about street crime and domestic crime, never corporate crime. Barsamian: What do you think of recent arguments about free speech on campuses and students refusing to allow certain public figures to speak at events? Nader: The campuses have really changed.

Now they have conflicts over politically correct speech. People used to be invited to speak before large auditoriums full of rapt students ready to sign petitions. Those days are over. I really mean over. They walk through campus looking at their cellphones. They know less and less about history. They are factually deprived, in part because they think they can access any fact at their fingertips anytime, anywhere.

So why would they want to know the names of the Supreme Court justices, or the name of their governor, or the name of their member of Congress? The main way to get a rise out of students today is with verbal slurs about gender and race. All this provided camouflage to cover how his deregulators have devastated law enforcement for deadly, widespread corporate abuses. Nader: When I was in college, the right wing were the censors, and the liberals were the defenders of free speech.

Barsamian: What do you think about some of these activist movements that have developed in the last few years — Black Lives Matter, Nader: Not enough elderly people in them. Retirement communities could be incubators for peaceful revolution. Their residents have a lot of leisure time. Remember the Gray Panthers? They were started by Maggie Kuhn, a social worker for the Presbyterian Church.

After she was mandatorily retired in her sixties, she was outraged. She stood up and mobilized older people all over the country. I think we ought to rouse the elderly. They have wisdom, experience, historical knowledge.

These are people who have time, they have perspective, and I think they are concerned about what effect they will have on their descendants. Barsamian: Along that line, what we are doing now to the earth is going to have an enormous impact on future generations in terms of climate change and economic and social devastation. Nader: Yes, and that can motivate young people, too, especially on campuses. Why do we so often use the words of our adversaries? It means giving taxpayer dollars to nuclear submarines or the next ten military adventures overseas instead of renovating our schools and building clinics and improving our public transit and highways and bridges and courthouses.

The language we use is very important. Nader: Yes. Liberals are very bad at coining phrases. The big corporate crime is Wells Fargo embezzling from the American people, creating fictitious accounts without even letting its customers know about it.