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Slightly disappointed that the story has to roll over into another book as I've a sinking feeling that Scarrow may waste what has been a good plotline so far and, along with the obligatory siege he's undoubtably going to force into the plot of the next book, may well turn it into a stale affair where everything goes out not with a bang but a bloody whimper, in both senses of the word. View all 3 comments.

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Aug 07, Steve rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction. The Gladiator I won't ruin the plot so far, but they're each strong enough character's to carry a chapter on their own. Here they are stranded in a different scenario and up against the odds once again. This time against a former slave, a for The Gladiator This time against a former slave, a former Gladiator, and an entire army of risen men and women. The Gladiator has battle knowledge, a really good strategist, and this is not what they need.

But it appears to be more personal, especially where Macro and Cato are concerned. Oh, and Cato's has a young love to consider, and vice versa. Truly good characters and well written So far, so good, though the start I didn't find to be the best entrance into the book, it was necessary. It's somehow different to the others in the Eagle series. It's not just the beginning though that is part of it , it's also the placing a small island , the secondary characters and Catos' betrothed.

Maybe even a different style to Scarrow's writing in this one, but a major factor is that Macro and Cato are seperated in many a chapter most of the book. That said, I'd still recommend it and have to give it 4 stars. View 2 comments. Apr 16, William Ballard rated it it was amazing. I picked this book up at The Works on a sale, not realising that there are 8 books before it, and there are more after too. I have around 13 more books to read to catch up on the series, and if they're are all like this one, they shall be a pleasure to read. Simon Scarrow's gripping plot in this is very easy to read.

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That is, it pulls you right into the action from the first few pages. Also, as someone who hasn't read the other books, I found it easy to follow what was happening. It is a fantast I picked this book up at The Works on a sale, not realising that there are 8 books before it, and there are more after too. It is a fantastic story in its own right, but I look forward to reading the other books to get a sense of where this plot fits with the others.

Sep 26, Christopher Taylor rated it liked it. Although this is deep into a series of novels about Roman soldiers Macro and Cato, it didn't feel as though I'd missed much because the story stands well on its own. The research is good and the situation interesting, involving a massive earthquake that tore Cyprus apart in the middle of the first century AD and a slave revolt. Overall the story was pretty well done, and rarely goes a direction you expect.

Things that are planned almost never go as intended, but overall the good guys generally wi Although this is deep into a series of novels about Roman soldiers Macro and Cato, it didn't feel as though I'd missed much because the story stands well on its own. Things that are planned almost never go as intended, but overall the good guys generally win. I do have a problem with the way the soldiers speak -- always a concern when writing historical novels, particularly this far in the past.

Colloquialisms and patterns of speech that are too modern feel jarring, but no one is exactly sure how people spoke years ago, either. A decent novel, part of a series I'm willing to try another book in, but not enormously compelling to me. Scarrow has really stepped up his game this one.

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Started it yesterday and finished today. The best Eagle book so far : At the end of the last book Cato and Macro were headed back to Rome to be reassigned and for Cato and Julia to get married Things don't go to plan as an Earthquake and tidle wave hits Crete just as their ship is floating past it. With many of the people in charge killed and a full on slave revolt, it's up to Macro and Cato to save the day again. I've said it before and Scarrow has really stepped up his game this one.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Cato and Macro have one of the best fictional relationships I've ever come across. They are great characters and even though I should feel sorry for the slaves, as their lives are terrible, well not Ajax -he deserves it, because they are against them I just want them to lose. There is lots of drama and excitment in this one as Macro and Julia are taken captive.

Cato gets underestimated more than normal in this book which I didn't like, I think he's proved himself by now! Although the end of this book is sorta happy, it ends with Cato and Marco heading off on another adventure and that wedding I was looking forward to in the last book seems to have been pushed back again. A great addition to the series but could also be read as a standalone novel. Nov 29, D. After success in the last book, and as this is a series, we do expect success by the end of the novel, it is time to make our way home to Rome and for the heroes to get their rewards.

Macro and Cato have been stepping up and giving great needed service to Rome, and Claudius and they deserve accolades. Instead an earthquake and tidal wave beset them as they are near Crete. It throws the Island into turmoil, seriously hammering the infrastructure and forcing our two Centurions to step up once more. We see the continuing evolution of Cato as a leader and we also see that Macro, once the Master, now becoming the lieutenant. Something that we knew from book one was a possibility and long overdue.

What comes as an unexpected and pleasant addition is that we have an enemy who we had left behind long ago, emerge. One that gives us plausible cause to believe he is not only present at the recovering Crete, but his actions will and do impact the story. In all, a very good book and nice to see Cato finally on his path instead of treading water. A definite reread when we have the entire series finished.

Aug 27, David Campton rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction. Wherever Centurions Macro and Cato go their paths are dogged by disaster. This time their doomladen shadow falls on the island of Crete, and while the story was inspired by a holiday that Simon Scarrow took on the island, this episode in the ongoing series is no holiday for those involved, as they get caught up in an earthquake, tsunami and a Spartacus-like slave rebellion.

Scarrow touches briefly on the necessity and cruelty of the slavery system in the Roman Empire, but sadly doesn't capitaliz Wherever Centurions Macro and Cato go their paths are dogged by disaster. Scarrow touches briefly on the necessity and cruelty of the slavery system in the Roman Empire, but sadly doesn't capitalize on that to create sympathy for the rebels, partly because the leader, Ajax, comes across as a 2 dimensional melodramatic villain, with some very stilted dialogue.

This is unusual for Scarrow, who normally draws up very believable characters. What is not unusual is that the scenes between Cato and his beloved Julia are embarrassingly cringeworthy.

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Please Simon, stick to describing battlefield gore rather than romantic twaddle. May 31, Dawn rated it liked it Shelves: read , locale-roman-empire , historical-fiction. It would have been much better to read this prior to The Legion. Both because I had no idea what was going on in the later book when I read it and this time because I knew what the outcome would be already. I find that I prefer the books in this series that have a little more of the political in them, rather than the all battle or lead up to a battle sequences such as this one.

So, not the best in the series in my opinion but still with great characters and lots of good history. Jul 30, Jack Alriksson rated it did not like it. This book convinced me to give up on the series. I've read all previous novels and I've got used to the thin plots, poorly-written villains and predictable plot twists. I didn't mind them much, I was reading them mostly for the battles. However, Gladiator was dull. Rather ridiculous plot, characters acting, well, out of character, decisions that defy even the most primitive logic and descriptions that gave Crete where the action is supposed to take place the charming air of "generic Greek isla This book convinced me to give up on the series.

Rather ridiculous plot, characters acting, well, out of character, decisions that defy even the most primitive logic and descriptions that gave Crete where the action is supposed to take place the charming air of "generic Greek island". I loved it. But not for the reason I bought it for, but for the book's remarkable description of the lack of morality of all the characters.

I picked the book up on sale at a bookshop in Parma, Italy, because I thought it would be a good way to learn more Italian. I was attracted to the cover a big gladiator in a helmet because I thought there'd be plenty of action. And there was. How not when the setting is the Roman empire in the first century A. What surprised me is that the story did not provide any people to root for. There were no heroes. At the beginning of the book, I was convinced that, of course, the Romans were the good guys as they were the main characters trying to take the chaos in hand.

But they weren't so good. They were convinced of their excellence and superiority. If you think of them as occupying Nazis, you get a better view of their sway. In terms of the slave rebellion, you get a view of the systemic subjugation and de-humanization of huge numbers of people - another Nazi quality. The Romans actually believe that slaves are to be used as cogs in a machine, the industrial agricultural machine, for example; that they don't need really to be fed well, etc. It all sounds familiar because it was done in this very country just a years ago and not years ago!

From our point of view, the "heroes" are flawed. At the same time, the members of the slave army elicit our compassion, but they have a desperation that leads to gross violence, acts of revenge, and so forth. So the author had to confront the problem of a "truthful" ending that comported with both history, that is, continued Roman domination, and at least this reader's sympathy with the slaves and feelings of revulsion for the Nazis.

He manages this pretty well in a cliffhanger last couple of chapters. He also lays the ground for more books! Take a look at this book. It and the others in the series were written in English. So, they must be available. I read the Italian because I thought a translation from the English might give me a vocabulary "assist. One of the biggest complaint about Scarrow's stories is that there is always a siege somewhere.

I never noticed this until this book. In fact, there are two sieges in this book amidst a slave rebellion. And what surprised me was the return of a person we all thought dead.

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I won't say more. One other thing is that Cato looks too young to be a centurion, let alone a seasoned veteran. Eventually, he grows up and people should start seeing past his youth. Nevertheless, the pace is good. The research One of the biggest complaint about Scarrow's stories is that there is always a siege somewhere. The research is extensive. Like good historical fiction, having an academic degree in that field helps the author too. At the same time, it is not too technical. Jan 14, James Casey rated it it was amazing.

Once again a great novel by Simon Scarrow. After five years Cato is becoming the total soldier and is now an acting prefect, while Macro, who is now a centurion, remains the hard and gritty soldier that he has always been. Although they are always given the most arduous tasks their friendship stays reliable and strong although Macro is now realising how Cato is becoming really astute in the tactics of battle and points of politics, but no matter how well their achievements may be, they are still Once again a great novel by Simon Scarrow.

Although they are always given the most arduous tasks their friendship stays reliable and strong although Macro is now realising how Cato is becoming really astute in the tactics of battle and points of politics, but no matter how well their achievements may be, they are still never appreciated enough. Full marks. This tale of a pair of Roman centurions who get washed up on the shores of Crete following an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami is not going to stretch anyone's brain too much.

The Gladiator (Eagle, #9) by Simon Scarrow

But if you're into some riproaring action, intrigue, twists and turns, tension and a fast moving story, you'll probably really enjoy this as a bit of light entertainment - I certainly did! Jun 04, Nicholas Parsons rated it liked it. Full of cliches, implausible scenarios and improbable dialogue, this book, like the rest of the series, is a fun read for anyone looking for a light historical fiction adventure set in the ancient Roman Empire. But it is recommended to start with a book one.

The cliche dialogue and action is mitigated somewhat by the detailed description of Roman military and foreign lands under Roman rule. Feb 21, Dennis Steussy rated it it was amazing. I'm reading the Simon Scarrow Eagle series. This nineth book was very good and full of mystery. It takes place on an island near Italy and is part of a slave revolt. While all of the books in this series are very brutal in their description of battle scenes, this one is especially strong in this area and isn't a book for the faint of heart. This could be a stand along book in the series too.

Aug 24, SEAN rated it it was amazing. For me this was a back to form book for Macro and Cato with an engaging story and an action packed adventure. A nod to the past and a setting for a new quest in place makes me want to turn to the next one straight away as the saga continues. Five stars and worth it! Jan 18, Mike Mason rated it it was amazing.

A great read. The characters of Cato and Macro are brilliant. Jun 24, Marvin Wurr rated it it was amazing. Our two plucky villains stab rebelling slaves on Crete. Another interesting instalment in the series. Mikaal Tomas is a great character, no question, but "forming one of the most famous and long-lasting homosexual relationships in comics history"? It's like the person who wrote the post hadn't read the books. Jack Knight doesn't get a mention until James Robinson brings him up.

The Starman news is super annoying. The first two paperback volumes are sitting on my shelf unread being saved up for a binge next year when I had all 6 in my hands. I have never read the series but have heard so many good things about it that when these paperbacks were announced I decided to jump on. Now I don't know when I'll get to read the run because those second hand copies of the hardcovers are both really expensive and generally in pretty bad shape.

I am your typical OCD collector: I can't deal with having to piece together multiple formats to make up a run. Just echoed your sentiments in a post above, Chaz - I feel your pain! I am a big fan of Starman but I don't think it's the kind of evergreen material that Watchmen or Sandman is. It's very well-done but it's rooted very heavily in the particular DC continuity of that era. It's kind of a DC fanboy's wet dream, really - it's got all these obscure characters played completely straight, and in many ways the whole thing is a love letter to DC continuity, but I suspect that limits its appeal to dedicated DC readers.

I am a little bummed to see DC's first real attempt at SC versions of their "Omnibus" editions fail, though. Actually, DC's first attempt at softcover versions of their omnibi was Jack Kirby's Fourth World, and all four volumes got enough pre-orders to go to the printers, thankfully. I guess it can be considered evergreen material. I was looking forward to "Legion Worlds" and thank you DC for pulling the rug from under me.

But then again, I am not terribly surprised. I'm so pissed that Starman paperbacks got cancelled. I had heard about the series and purchased the first paperback and loved it. I immediately bought the second and preordered the third and fourth. Now I know why Amazon has removed the book from their site. This is maddening. I want my Starman! Now I don't know what to do. I can't help but think that this could be the end for Chronicles.

Mark Carlson-Ghost

Oh, boy. I had also been wanting to get into Starman but hadn't bought any of the books yet. Perhaps DC is gearing up to re-release it in their current, larger omnibus. Sorry for everyone who has those trades, though. What really troubles me is JLA Chronicles. The problem is DC has such a massive back catalog and they don't know what to do with it. The obvious answer would be to put these issues up on Comixology, but I guess that would make too much sense. If this is the end of the Chronicles line, they need to get it in gear and start making making more omnibi a la Golden Age Superman.

Alternatively, they could release color versions of the already-existing Showcase Presents. We know they've remastered the old JLA issues for the Archives, it shouldn't be that hard. I'd gladly pay a few extra bucks for a color version of that line. I just bought v. Had heard the series was good and I've always avoided the HC's. So with the TPB releases I was all in. Guess I'll have to decide whether or not to pick up the HC's now.

Booooo -urns. Still very bizarre One can only hope I really think it's just a matter of some retailers having trouble keeping their systems updated when a book is solicited and then cancelled. DC doesn't have this on their release schedule and they haven't announced it; I think there's very little chance none that DC would "stealth release" this book without letting customers know they're doing so.

If they have sufficient donations, please make an appointment to donate another time. Standard disclaimers apply that DC is a company and companies have to make money, and I don't necessarily expect DC to publish books that aren't going to net them a profit. Each of these cancellations is a shame, however; let's take a moment to see what we've lost. Whither Starman? Perhaps the most startling here is the cancellation of the paperback Starman Omnibus Vol.

In canceling this, DC must definitely be suggesting they no longer intend to continue paperback reprints of the original Starman Omnibus hardcovers, many of which are out of print. Once upon a time I might have expected Starman , like Sandman or Watchmen , to remain perpetually in print at DC, essentially printing money. But any number of factors -- from writer James Robinson having left comics for a while, to wisely the number of Starman spin-offs being few, to the entire saga's ejection from continuity with the New 52 -- seems to have dimmed the larger public's knowledge of Starman even as the stories themselves remain a treat.